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Library Development

Public Library Survey

Helpful Resources

The State Library provides helpful resources and training materials to assist you in completing the Public Library Survey. Below are some general resources that may be of use. More detailed information on specific survey sections can be found below.

Section 1: Current Administrative Information

Section 1 of the Public Library Survey collects the basic administrative information for your library district, information about your legal service area, and the number of outlets currently in operation. Much of this information does not tend to change year to year, and most of these questions will be pre-filled and locked. However, it is important to annually review this information for needed updates. If a locked field does need to be updated, please contact Cory Mihalik at cory.mihalik@sos.mo.gov. Please remember in this section and all future areas of the portion to report only for your library's most recently completed fiscal year.

1.04 – 1.06: The library director has changed. Should I report information for the director for the reporting fiscal year or the current library director?

When providing the library director information in 1.04-1.06 please report on the current library director. The majority of the survey is meant to gather retrospective information on the library’s most recent fiscal year. However, library director information is intended to make sure the State Library has the most up to date contact information for the head of the library. In order to accomplish this, fields 1.04, 1.05, and 1.06 should report the most recent information available.

1.19 How are library district legal service area populations determined and can they be changed?

Library district legal service area populations are determined by the State Library and updated after each Decennial Census. Due to the complexity involved with determining these populations they are only updated with complete populations counts from the Decennial Census. If you have questions or concerns with your library’s determined legal service area or population, please contact Cory Mihalik at the State Library.

1.25 How do I know if my library is part of a “federation or cooperative”?

These federations or cooperatives usually consist of groups of libraries working together cooperatively through shared cost structures and/or resource sharing. Most library consortia would be included under this category. Common groups in Missouri that would be included here include MoLib2Go, MOBIUS, Municipal Library Consortium, Grand River Libraries Conference, or Missouri Evergreen. Paid services such as OCLC or MOREnet would not be considered here.

1.33 – 1.34 How do I determine if I have a “Main” outlet or only “Branch” outlets?

For libraries with only a single physical location, this single outlet will always be considered the main outlet. For libraries with multiple locations, this will be a judgement from the library. There are no absolute criteria for determining whether a library is the main outlet, but a Library district’s main outlet will usually have significantly larger collections, receive larger amounts of traffic, may offer additional services and professional staff than branch libraries, and will usually house the library district’s administration. If most branches are equal in collections or services you may only have branch outlets.

1.35 We have a library vehicle that drops books off at offsite locations around the community. Would this be considered a Bookmobile?

This would likely not be considered a Bookmobile. All outlets, including Bookmobiles must have an organized collection, paid staff, and regularly scheduled visits for the public. A Bookmobile would need to have a browsable collection and staff to check out materials at the site. Library vehicles responsible for simple deliveries would not be counted here.

1.37 Our library uses little free libraries, and offsite book pickup and drop-off sites at other local businesses and community centers, would these be counted here?

This question is specific to offsite automated circulation facilities such as electronic kiosks and lockers. Offsite resources that do not provide automated checkouts through the library’s ILS would not be counted here.

1.01 Legal Name of Library District (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – This will be the full legal name of the library without acronyms or abbreviations. This name will rarely if ever change, and all names are formatted for consistency between annual surveys.       

1.02 Other Name(s) (pre-filled and locked) – Commonly used names other than the official, legal name for the library. This information assists in tracking and reporting. This should only be used if the commonly used name for the library differs from the legal name of the library district.

1.03 Legal Basis Code (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – The legal basis is the type of local government structure within which the library functions. The codes are as follows:

  • LD – Library District: Established under RSMo 182 as a separate government entity supported from a citizen–voted tax dedicated to library purposes.
  • CI – Municipal Government: Library is operated as part of city government and supported with funds from that city, town or village.
  • NP – Non–Profit Association or Agency: An entity privately controlled but meeting the statutory definition of a public library in the state; includes association libraries and libraries with 501(c) designation.
  • OT – Other

1.04 - 1.06 Information about Current Head of Library – Provide the name, title and direct email address for the current person officially charged with and paid for day to day management of the library. Do not report a trustee or an elected official as head of library. If you are a new Director, this information will need to be updated with your most current information.

1.07 – 1.15 Administrative Office Location and Mailing Address (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – Provide the physical and mailing addresses of the library’s administrative entity. This will often be the main library, but can also be administrative offices housed outside of a library outlet.

1.16 Library’s Email (pre-filled) – Email address used by the general public to reach the library. This may or may not differ from the library address listed for the head of the library.

1.17 Library-s Web Address (pre-filled) – Web address for the library’s homepage. This should be the main address for library information, not a link to the library’s catalog.

1.18 Does the library provide a mobile-device accessible version of its website (pre-filled) – If website is formatted to be mobile device accessible please select yes. All library websites created through the State Library’s PLOUD program will by default be mobile device accessible.

1.19 2020 Census Population of Legal Service Area (pre-filled and locked) – Total population residing in library district’s legal service area as determined by the 2020 decennial census counts. These figures are calculated by the state library. For libraries affected by the 1965 boundary law, LSA population may not match the Census population figures of matching municipality or county. If you have questions about determination of LSA populations, please contact the State Library.

1.20 – 1.23 Library Legislative Districts (pre-filled and locked) – Listing of all state and federal legislative districts overlapping the libraries legal service area. Legislative are updated by the State Library after redistricting occurs for each decennial census.

1.24 Meets FSCS Definition of a Library – Indicate yes, if your library currently meets the Federal-State Cooperative System (FSCS) definition of a library, which states that:

“A public library is an entity that is established under state enabling laws or regulations to serve a community, district, or region, and that provides at least the following:

(1) an organized collection of printed or other library materials, or a combination thereof

(2) paid staff

(3) an established schedule in which services of the staff are available to the public

(4) the facilities necessary to support such a collection, staff and schedule

(5) is supported in whole or in part with public funds.”

1.25 Is this library  district a member of a federation or cooperative Indicate “yes” if your library district is (a) joined by formal or informal agreement(s) with another library district(s) in Missouri to perform various services cooperatively, such as resource sharing, or (b) part of a national, multi–state or statewide library federation or cooperative such as MoLib2Go, MOBIUS, Municipal Library Consortium, Grand River Libraries Conference or Missouri Evergreen. Do not consider OCLC or MOREnet memberships for this question.

1.26 – 1.27 Reporting Period (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – Reporting period for the survey is based on the library’s most recently completed fiscal year.

1.28 Were there any changes to your library district's legal service area during this report period (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – Report any changes to the library district’s legal service area through library district mergers, adoptions, or dissolutions

1.29 Counties in Library's Legal Service Area (pre-filled and locked) - List the counties within the legal service area of the library and all its outlets. For multi–county libraries, list the county of the administrative office/main library first.

1.30 Geographic Type (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – Geography type that best matches the library district based on U.S. Census Bureau geographies. Geographies are assigned by the State Library. Missouri libraries can fall into one of the following:

  • PL1 – Place Entirety (library exactly matches current legal boundaries of a municipality)
  • PL2 – Place Overlap (library is based on boundaries of municipality but does not exactly match current legal boundaries)
  • CO1 – County Entirety (library exactly matches current legal boundaries of county)
  • CO3 – County Remainder (library is based on boundaries of county, but excludes areas belonging to contained municipal libraries)
  • MC1 – Multi-County (library exactly matches current legal boundaries of two or more counties)
  • MC3 – Multi-County Remainder (library is based on boundaries of two or more counties, but excludes areas belonging to contained municipal libraries)
  • SU1 – School-District Unified (library district boundaries match those of a unified school district, or combined unified school districts)

1.31 Locale (pre-filled and locked)National Center for Education Statistics locale code, that best matches the library district. Locales are assigned by the State Library.

1.32 Matches (pre-filled and locked) – Specifies whether the library district matches NCES locale code exactly or nearly. Larger library districts may match multiple locale codes, and code that is most appropriate is used.

For a library location or service to be reported as an outlet it must meet four criteria:

  1. Separate quarters, i.e. a physical space that can be a building, truck or van
  2. Organized collection of library materials
  3. Paid staff
  4. Regularly scheduled public hours

All library outlets reported in 1.33-1.35 will also be reported in detail in section 2 of the survey. Library kiosks and lockers are not library outlets and will not be reported in the outlet section of the survey, but are reported in the administrative information.

1.33 Main (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – This must be reported as either a 1 or a 0. A library district cannot have more than one main outlet. All single outlet libraries will report one main outlet. For a multiple-outlet library district, a zero may be reported if the library operates several co-equal outlets with no principal collection housed in one location. In cases where collections and/or administration is primarily housed at one location, that will be considered the main outlet.

1.34 Branches (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – Auxiliary outlet that his housed separately from the main outlet. A branch outlet must have an organized collection of library materials, paid staff, and regularly scheduled public hours.

1.35 Bookmobiles (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – A traveling branch library with an organized collection, paid staff, and regularly scheduled visits open to the public. Vehicles used solely to carry items between branches or to outside locations will not be counted here. Provide the number of vehicles in use, not the number of stops the vehicle makes.

1.37 Offsite Circulating Kiosks/Lockers - Unstaffed locations outside of a library branch or central library that circulate physical and/or electronic materials. Reported kiosks and lockers should be permanent or semi-permanent locations that allow for circulation of library materials and may or may not provide other library services such as wireless internet access. These locations are counted separately from library outlets and will not be reported in the outlet portion of the survey.         

1.37 Is your Administrative Office housed in a separate building from all direct service outlet(s) (pre-filled, locked, IMLS reported) – Indicate if your main administrative offices are housed in a location other than any of the main or branch outlets indicated above.      

 

1.38 Does the library have an allied Library Foundation – Indicate if your library has a separate legal entity who collects and manages donations, investments, and other private funds for the library district.

1.39 Does the library have a 'Friends of the Library' group – Indicate if your library has an associated volunteer-led charitable nonprofit focused on supporting the library district.           

1.40 Does the library offer book delivery outreach services (home delivery of books by car or van) Indicate if your library offers direct delivery of library items to patron residences by staff or volunteers.

1.41 Does the library offer a books by mail service – Indicate if your library offers direct delivery of library items to patron residences by mail.

Section 2: Public Service Outlets

Libraries will report information for each active library outlet and bookmobile. Much of the general information for library outlets will already be filled out for your library based on the previous year's survey. If outlet information needs to be changed or library outlets need to be added or removed please contact Cory Mihalik at cory.mihalik@sos.mo.gov

Please note that question numbers will repeat for each individual outlet. Five outlets will be shown per page. If your library has more than five outlets, your outlet reporting will be on multiple pages.

Our library just opened up a new branch or bookmobile. How do I get this outlet added to the survey?

Branches should only be added to the survey if they were in operation during your library’s reporting period. If the branch was open to the public at any point during the reporting period please email cory.mihalik@sos.mo.gov with the relevant branch information. You will submit the legal name of the outlet, other name used if it is commonly referred to by another name, address, phone number, and square footage. Once this information is sent, the outlet will be added to the survey and you will be able to input annual hours and other information. If the new branch was opened after the end of your reporting fiscal year, this information will be submitted during the next annual survey and the branch will be added at that point.

I don’t have an FSCS for my new outlet, how do I obtain one?

FSCS numbers are generated for outlets at the point the survey is submitted to IMLS for review. For the first year the branch is reported, the FSCS number will be blank. If you need an FSCS number for a new branch outside of the normal survey timeline, please contact cory.mihalik@sos.mo.gov to see about expediting the process.

Our library just closed one of our outlets. How do I remove this outlet from the survey?

If a branch was open for any amount of time during your reporting period it will still be reported on the annual survey. Branches can only be removed from the survey if they had no operating hours in the reporting fiscal year. If you have a branch that was closed the prior fiscal year and had no operating hours, please contact cory.mihalik@sos.mo.gov to have the outlet permanently removed from your survey.

We have a library vehicle that drops books off at offsite locations around the community. Should this be included as a bookmobile outlet?

This would likely not be considered a bookmobile. All outlets, including bookmobiles must have an organized collection, paid staff, and regularly scheduled visits for the public. A bookmobile would need to have a browsable collection and staff to check out materials at the site. Library vehicles responsible for simple deliveries would not be reported here.

Our library uses offsite circulating kiosks, book lockers, little free libraries, and offsite book pickup and drop-off sites at other local businesses and community centers, would any of these be considered an outlet?

None of these would be included as an outlet. Outlets require regular operating hours, separate quarters, paid staff, and regularly scheduled public hours. These types of services would not meet the definition of a library outlet. While the number of circulating kiosks and book lockers are reported in field 1.36, these devices do not meet the official definitions of an outlet and would not be reported here.

2.00 Library System Name (pre-filled, locked) – This will match the legal name of the library in use for 1.01.

2.01a Legal Name of Outlet (pre-filled, locked) – This is the legal name of the outlet used by your library. This information will be pre-filled, but if a library outlet has undergone a name change, please contact the State Library to have the name changed.

2.01b FSCS (pre-filled, locked) – An outlet’s FSCS code is a unique identifier assigned by IMLS for all reported library outlets. A unique FSCS is created for an outlet the first time it is submitted to IMLS through the PLS. This code will be unchanged year to year.

2.02 Other Name (pre-filled, locked) - Commonly used names other than the official, legal name for the outlet. This information assists in tracking and reporting. This should only be used if the commonly used name for the library differs from official name of the outlet.

2.03 - 2.07 – Library address and contact information (pre-filled, locked) – Report the address for the physical location of the outlet. If reporting a Bookmobile, report the physical location the Bookmobile usually resides, likely the same address as the main library outlet. If a library has changed locations, or an address has changed for another reason, please contact the State Library with revised information.

2.08a Metropolitan Status Code (pre-filled, locked) – Denotes whether a library location resides inside of a Census designated metropolitan area.

  • CC – Within Central City of Census designated Metropolitan Area (namely Cape Girardeau, Columbia, Jackson, Jefferson City, Joplin, Kansas City, St. Charles, St. Joseph, St. Louis, and Springfield)
  • NC – In Census designated Metropolitan Area, but not in Central City
  • NO – Not in a Census designated Metropolitan Area

2.08b Locale (pre-filled, locked) - National Center for Education Statistics locale code, that best matches the location of the outlet. Locales are assigned by the State Library.

2.09 Outlet Type (pre-filled, locked) – This will report the type of outlet being reported to match reporting definitions used in 1.33 – 1.35. The district’s main library will be identified here, and all others will be reported as a branch or bookmobile.

2.10 Square Footage of the Outlet (pre-filled, locked) - This is the area, in square feet, of all floors enclosed by the outer walls. Include all area occupied by the outlet, including those areas off–limits to the public. Include any areas shared with another agency(ies) if the outlet has use of that area. Square footage will not be reported for bookmobiles. If a library has moved or been renovated in a way that changes square footage, please contact the State Library with new square footage.

2.11 Number of Bookmobiles (pre-filled, locked) – This will be reported as 1 for all Bookmobiles and 0 for all other types of outlets.

2.12 – 2.15 Mailing Address (pre-filled, locked) – Only enter new address if mailing address is different from outlet address listed in 2.03-2.05.

2.16 Outlet Manager – Please provide the name of the current manager of this outlet. If this is a single outlet library, and the director fulfills the duties of day to day management of the outlet, provide the directors name.

Please note, auto-summing is not enabled in the outlet portions of the survey. All fields that calculate based on prior answers will need to be calculated by hand.

2.17 – 2.23 Total Hours/Day – Report the number of hours your library is open to the public each day of the week. If your library has different seasonal operating hours you will report the standard hours for the majority of the year here. If your hours are not a whole number use decimal places. If your library was open 8:30 A.M. – 5:00 P.M. you would report 8.5 hours for that day.

2.24 Total Outlet Hours Per Week – This will be the sum of all hours reported per day. Summing fields 2.17 – 2.23 will give the total outlet hours per week. This should reflect the weekly hours your library operated at for the majority of the year.

2.25 Weeks Open During the Year (IMLS reported) – Libraries will normally operate for 52 weeks out of the year. If the library outlet was closed to the public at any point during the reporting year, please indicate as such (by subtracting the number of weeks closed from 52) and provide the number of weeks the outlet was open. For this survey, a “week closed” should be counted as 4 or more consecutive days closed, or being closed for more than half of the scheduled hours in a given week. Closures can be due to natural disasters, renovation or other planned or unexpected events.

2.26 Did this outlet have regular hours during the reporting year that were different than those provided above? – Mark yes here if the library had seasonal hours that differed from those reported in 2.17 – 2.23, or changed hours for any other reason during the reporting period.

2.27a If yes, please list the differing day(s) and hours here - If the library has regularly scheduled abbreviated hours (for instance, summer hours), please indicate the differing hours and days. Provide operating hours by day for those that differ from 2.17 – 2.23. For instance, if your library was open 8:30 – 7:00 on weekdays in the summer instead of 8:30 – 5:00 the rest of the year, 2.27a would note M-F 8:30 AM – 7:00 PM.

2.27b For how many weeks did the outlet operate with these differing hours – Provide the number of weeks the library operated with the differing hours reported in 2.27a. Round to the whole week.

2.28 Total Outlet Hours per Year - This is the total number of hours an outlet was open to the public in a year’s time. This can be figured by multiplying the total outlet hours per week by the weeks open during the year and adding/subtracting the seasonal hours, holidays, and any other closures (if applicable).

2.29a Does this outlet offer public meeting space – Indicate yes if the library offers a separate space in a library building set aside for meetings that can be used by the public. The library may or may not charge a fee for the use of the room.

2.29b What is the seating capacity of the largest single meeting space (if applicable) – If 2.29a is reported as yes, please provide the seating capacity of the largest single meeting space. This would be the maximum amount of seating that could be available for a meeting or event.

2.30 Total number of times meeting rooms used by outside groups for non-library programs - Please report the total number of times meeting or study rooms were used by outside groups or individuals for events not sponsored or co–sponsored by the library. Do not include use of the room for library programs, service or other use by library boards or staff.

Section 3: Personnel

The personnel portion of the survey will collect information on library staff and the library director. Count all paid personnel positions as of the last day of the fiscal year on which you are reporting. In each category, include a sum of the number of hours worked per week by all positions funded in the library’s budget, whether those positions were filled or not. Inputting total number of staff and total hours per week worked will automatically calculate full time equivalents for all staff. Information about library volunteers and the director are also reported here.

3.01 How do I know if a staff position is a “librarian”?

Staff reported as librarians will usually, but not always have the job title of librarian. There are no absolute criteria for determining if a staff position is or is not a librarian, but these are usually professional positions requiring specific training and skills in librarianship. If a position is primarily responsible for tasks such as answering reference questions and programming, these would usually be librarian positions. Individuals primarily responsible for administrative or clerical duties such as shelving materials, circulation, management, human resources, accounting, etc. would likely not be classified as librarians.

3.01 – 3.04 What personnel category should the library director be reported in?

This may vary by library. The director should be reported in the category that matches their primary job duties and whether or not they have an ALA-MLS degree. For small libraries where a director’s main job duties include direct patron assistance, programming, collection development, and cataloging, they may be classified as a librarian. For libraries where a director’s duties are primarily administrative, they will likely be classified as non-librarian ALA-MLS staff or other staff depending on whether or not they possess an MLS degree.

3.01 – 3.04 Our library utilizes substitutes that have irregular and/or infrequent hours. How should they be reported on the survey?

These staff will be reported for the position that most meets their primary job duties as a librarian or other staff. Each substitute will be reported as one staff member. To determine average weekly hours you will determine, or make a best estimate, of the total hours worked in a year and divide this out by 52 total weeks to get the average hours per week these staff worked. This may be a very small number, but the position and hours should still be reported on the survey.

3.01 – 3.04 We had several positions open at the end of our fiscal year. Should these vacant positions be reported in the total number of staff, or only the positions that were filled at the end the fiscal year?

You will be reporting for all budgeted positions. If a position was open at the end of the fiscal year you will still report the position and budgeted hours in the appropriate categories. However, if a position was permanently eliminated and will not be filled in the future it will not be reported.

3.07 – 3.09 Why does the survey ask questions specifically about the director’s salary, tenure and education?

This information is valuable in a number of ways. Primarily, this is information that is frequently requested by library boards or directors for salary comparisons and determinations. Ideally, we would be able to collect salary information for all library positions that could be utilized by libraries statewide for salary studies, but this would be extremely burdensome. We currently only collect information about the director as it is by far the most requested personnel information.

3.07 – 3.09 I am a new director reporting on the survey, and the director who previously held this position is no longer here. They were still in the position on the last day of the fiscal year. When filling in the information about the library director should I report my information or information on the previous director?

You will report information for the previous director if available. Information provided here will be for the director on the last day of the fiscal year. While the director contact information provided in the administrative information portion of the survey will be for the current director, information on salary and tenure will be reflective of the fiscal year being reported, as this will match the revenue and expenses reported on the survey as well. If no information on the previous director is available to you, you can report on the current director only in the case where no other information is available.

When reporting total staff and average weekly hours, remember to include the library director in the most applicable reporting category

3.01a – 3.01c Librarians (IMLS reported) – Report the total number of library staff positions on the last day of your fiscal year that held the title of librarian, and the average number of hours per week worked by these staff. These will be staff positions paid from the library budget with the title or function of librarian, defined as persons who do paid work that usually requires professional training and skill in the theoretical or scientific aspects of library work, or both, as distinct from its mechanical or clerical aspect.

3.02a – 3.02c Librarians with ALA-MLS (IMLS reported) – Of the librarians reported in 3.01 provide the number of staff and average weekly hours for those that have a master’s degree from programs of library and information studies accredited by the American Library Association. Only count MLS staff here whose primarily job description is that of a librarian. Please note that the number of staff and hours reported in 3.02 cannot be greater than 3.01.

 3.03a – 3.03c All other staff with ALA-MLS (IMLS reported) – Report the total number of staff positions and average weekly hours on the last day of your fiscal year for those staff that have a master’s degree from programs of library and information studies accredited by the American Library Association, but do not have the job title of librarian. Any staff reported in 3.01 and 3.02 will not be reported here. This could include the Library Director, a branch Manager, Personnel Officer, etc.

3.04a – 3.04d All other paid staff (IMLS reported) – Report the total number of staff positions and average annual hours on the last day of the fiscal year for all staff who do not perform the duties of a librarian and do not have an ALA-MLS degree. These could include including circulation, security, maintenance staff, pages, etc. Any staff reported in 3.01 – 3.04 should not be reported here. Do NOT count any staff paid with grant funds (i.e., those hired to work only on a special grant–funded project).

3.05a – 3.05c Total staff (autosum, locked, IMLS reported) – The total number of staff, average weekly hours and average FTEs will automatically calculate based on the answers provided in 3.01 – 3.04. If the totals in 3.05 look to be incorrect, this indicates an error in entering staff in 3.01 – 3.04. No direct changes can be made to 3.05a – 3.05c.

3.06a – 3.06b Library volunteers - Provide the number of people who volunteered at the library during the reporting period and an estimate of the average volunteer hours donated per year (e.g., volunteers serving in the library 2 hours per day for five days per week would donate 520 hours per year).

Questions about Library Director or Executive Officer

3.07 Hours worked per week – Indicate the number of hours the director works in an average week.

3.08a Annual salary (in dollars) – Indicate total annual salary before deductions but excluding benefits.

3.08b Annual Benefits (in dollars) - Benefits outside of salary paid and accruing to Director, such as retirement, medical insurance, life insurance, guaranteed disability income protection, tuition and housing benefits.

3.08c Tenure of Library Director – Select from the dropdown menu to select the amount of time most closely matches how long the director has held this position.

3.09 Highest Education Level Completed – Select from the dropdown menu to indicate the current highest educational attainment of the Director (check only one).

Section 4: Operating Revenue

The revenue portion of the survey will collect information on income from a variety of sources for your most recent fiscal year. Please use the amounts submitted for your most recent State Aid filing, or from your libraries most recently completed fiscal year. Single district and consolidated libraries will only report in fields 4.01 through 4.18. Regional libraries will report additional district information in 4.19 – 4.30. These libraries should pay special attention to the library district being reported in each section. Remember, income received from bond issue/debt service, memorials, special funds, etc. specifically designated to be used for capital projects should NOT be included in this section. Those funds should be listed under Capital Revenue.

4.02 How do I find out my libraries assessed valuation?

The county clerk or county assessor should be able to provide you with your library’s assessed valuations. The State Auditor also keeps records of tax district assessed valuations that are available on their website. These values are also reported on the annual State Aid application, so you may check your copy of the application for assessed valuations and tax rates that have already been vetted by the State Library.

 4.03 – 4.04b What is the difference in the three tax rates in these questions, and how do I find these values?

Due to potential rollbacks due to the Hancock Amendment, your library’s final collected tax rate may differ from the actual tax rate passed by voters. Your library board also has the ability to collect taxes at a lower rate than the rate passed by voters. For this reason we ask for the tax rate last approved by voters (this will be the rate established by the most recently passed library tax), the tax rate ceiling set by the auditor (this will be the rate provided to your library as the maximum amount your library can collect and includes any Hancock rollbacks), and the tax rate set by the library board (this will be the rate approved by your board and was the actual collected tax rate). The voter approved and auditor ceiling rates can be located on your annual pro forma documents from the State Auditor. The board approved/collected tax rate should be available from internal documents from your board votes, or from the collector’s office. These values are also reported on your annual State Aid application, so you may just reference this document to locate all three rates easily in one place.

4.03 – 4.07 We are a city budget library. What should I report for tax rates and local tax income?

As a city budget library, there will be no tax rate to report in 4.03-4.04b, so all of these values will be zero. There should also not be any income to report in 4.05 or 4.06 for tax income, as this would be reporting for income specifically from a library tax. The library funding provided for your library by the city will be reported in 4.07 “any additional funds from the local government.”

4.05 Do I include collected delinquent taxes in annual tax levy income.

Yes, delinquent tax income will be included in 4.05 as regular tax income, and not in 4.06 other local tax income.

4.06 What should be counted as “other local tax income”?

Taxes not collected from a citizen voted library tax will be included here. Citizen voted taxes would include the standard voted tax, and additional levies such as temporary levies for buildings. However, any income from sales taxes, intangible tax, or surtaxes will be included here.

4.14 Where do I find the totals for what our library received for LSTA grants?

Your library should be tracking LSTA funds specific to grants internally separate from all other funds. If you are not exactly sure when payments received line up with your reporting period, you should be able to view EFT payments or checks received from the Missouri State Library, which will be dated and have a short identifier for the specific grants the funds were paid from. If you have any questions on payments you can contact Terry Blauvelt at terry.blauvelt@sos.mo.gov.

4.17a What would be included in the “other income” category?

This would include any annual income you receive that was not from a local, state, or federal tax income source. The most common of these sources of income would be from library fines, donations, earned interest, or funds raised from local friends groups.

4.17b Our library collects fines on specific items (adult materials, audiovisual materials, etc.), but not on others. Would we mark yes or no in 4.17b?

If your library charges any fines for late items of any material type, you will respond “yes” in 4.17b. Even if the majority of your items do not accrue fines, your library still collects some income as library fines. Please remember if your library charges replacement costs for lost or damaged items, this would not be considered a fine, and you would respond no to 4.17b if that is the only charges patrons receive.

4.01 Name of Library District (pre-filled, locked) - This will be the full legal name of the library without acronyms or abbreviations. Regional libraries will now which district they are reporting for based on the name pre-filled in 4.01.

4.02 Assessed valuation of library district (in dollars) - Report the value of property in the library’s legal service area. This information is available from the city or county clerk, as reported on your state aid application. For regional libraries, report the assessed value for each library district separately.

4.03 Tax rate last approved by voters (in cents) - Report the library’s most recent official, citizen–voted tax rate. This will be the official tax rate without any Hancock rollbacks. If the library receives income at multiple tax rates (residential, commercial, personal property, etc.), report the rate that generates the majority of the library’s tax income. The tax rates are usually available from your city or county clerk, as reported on your state aid application. Do NOT include any tax rates for temporary bond issues, only the district’s ongoing standard tax rate.

4.04a Tax rate ceiling set by auditor for reporting year (in cents) - Report the library’s tax rate, after auditor suggested rollbacks. If the library receives income at multiple tax rates (residential, commercial, personal property, etc.), report the rate that generates the majority of the library’s tax income. The tax rates are usually available from your city or county clerk, or from the annual pro forma tax documents from the State Auditor as reported on your state aid application. Do NOT include that which was voter approved under a bond issue.

4.04b Tax rate set by library board for reporting year (in cents) - Provide the rate agreed upon by the library board for the reporting year, and levied for the fiscal year reported.

4.05 Income from the library's tax levy (in dollars) - Report only the official tax receipts for the library from the library citizen–voted tax for the reporting period. Your city or county clerk can verify and provide those figures.

4.06 Other local tax income  - Local tax income not from the citizen–voted library tax. Examples would include sales tax, intangible tax, or any surtax. These taxes are uncommon and most libraries will report no funds here.

4.07 Any additional funds from the local government - Any additional funds from the local government not previously reported in this section. This would include funds designated by the local government for expenditure for library services. City-budget libraries will report all tax money provided by the municipality here.

4.08 Total local income (autosum, IMLS reported) – Sum of all local tax income reported in 4.05 – 4.07.

4.09 – 4.11 State Aid, Equalization, and A&E funds received (pre-filled, locked) – These are state funds received by the State Library for per capita State Aid, Equalization and A&E. These amounts are pre-filled by that State Library based on funds distributed for the library’s most recently completed fiscal year. You may check these values against your own records to verify there are no discrepancies and contact the State Library if you have questions.

4.12 Other state funds from local or state agencies – Report any state funds other than State Aid Equalization, and A&E funds. These may come from other state agencies, or from local agencies distributing funds received from the state. Do not report any federal funds distributed by state or local agencies, including the State Library here. Libraries receiving CSLP funds from the State Library will report those funds received here.

4.13 Total State Income (autosum, IMLS reported) - Sum of all state tax income reported in 4.09 – 4.12.

4.14 LSTA grants – Report all funds received by your library from LSTA grants during the reporting period. Examples of LSTA grants include Library Cooperation grants, Technology Ladder grants, and Show–Me–Steps to Career Development grants.

4.15 Other federal funds from local, state or federal agencies - All other federal funds, such as Green Thumb grants or emergency relief funds, distributed by local, state or federal entities to public libraries. All federal funds other than LSTA funds will be reported here.

4.16 Total Federal Income (autosum, IMLS reported) - Sum of all federal income reported in 4.14 and 4.15

4.17a Other Income - This includes all library income received during the fiscal year that was not reported as government income (Local, State, or Federal). This could be from private donations, interest, friends organizations, or any other source not reported in 4.01 – 4.16. Do NOT include the value of any contributed or in–kind services or the value of any non–monetary gifts and donations.

4.17b Are fines charged for overdue items? Overdue fines are monetary fines charged to patrons for items returned later than the item’s due date. These may be flat fees, or fees assessed on a daily or weekly basis based on the item type and length of time overdue. Mark yes if your library charges any type of overdue fine. This does not include other types of library fees such as charges for damaged or lost items. NOTE: Overdue fines are monetary penalties that typically increase according to the number of days the materials are overdue. Overdue fines are not replacement costs for lost or damaged materials.

4.18 Total Library District Operating Revenue (autosum, IMLS reported) – Sum of all income reported in 4.08, 4.13, 4.16, and 4.17a.

Fields 4.19 through 4.30 will only be filled out for regional libraries with multiple districts to report. These fields will be reported exactly the same as for 4.01 – 4.18. You may refer back to instructions for 4.01 – 4.18 for reference.

Fields 4.31 – 4.47 will total all applicable fields for regional library reporting. For single district libraries, these will correspond to the totals already calculated in 4.01 – 4.18. These final totals will be the values reported to IMLS. When viewing edit checks the valid checks will reference the final values in this section. To resolve any edit check issues, you may need to check the original cells being referenced to find the source of the errors.

Section 5: Operating Expenditures

The expenditures portion of the survey will collect information on annual expenditures for your most recent fiscal year. Expenses will be reported by major category. All expenditures for the library will be reported. Only funds spent during the reporting period will be reported. Please remember to exclude funds expended for capital projects (major renovations, new buildings, etc.). These expenditures will be reported in section 6 capital revenue and expenditures.

I have expenditures that do not seem to fit into any of the budget categories provided, where should they be reported?

Any expenditures that are not reported in the personnel, collections, or capital expenditures category will always be reported in 5.14 “Other Operating Expenditures.” The instructions give examples of the kinds of expenditures reported in this category, but this it not an exhaustive list, and all remaining expenditures will always be reported here.

5.01 Our library uses contract employees for certain services (inter-branch deliveries, lawn services, cleaning services, etc.). Would the wages for these contract employees be included in salaries or in other operating expenditures?

These expenditures would be included in “other operating expenditures”, not with salaries. These contract service individuals would not be considered library employees, and would not be counted in totals for annual salaries. Rather, this would be a service the library contracts for.

5.08 Our library receives access to electronic databases and/or circulating electronic material collections through a consortia membership and/or MOREnet. Should these consortia/MOREnet fees be reported as electronic material expenditures or other operating expenditures?

If the group providing the electronic materials provides a breakdown of services by cost, you can report the amount of the membership that goes towards electronic materials in 5.08, and the remaining cost in 5.14. If you do not know the exact breakdowns, but know that the majority of the cost of the service is for an electronic material collection or shared database access, you can report the total cost of the membership in 5.08. Otherwise, the total cost of membership will be reported in 5.14, even though part of the fee goes towards electronic materials. MOLIB2GO members will always report the full cost of MOLIB2GO membership in 5.08.

5.09 Do Playaway audio devices count as electronic or physical materials?

These all-in-one units will be counted as a physical material. Even though it is technically a digital audio book, the patron is checking out a physical copy of an audio material.

5.16a – 5.16b Equalization and A&E funds received are already filled in on the survey, but how do we know how much was expended? Is it the same amount?

Your library should be tracking expenditures of Equalization and A&E funds in a separate budget category throughout the year. These funds are reported to the State Library in a special report in mid-February. You will only report the amount of these funds expended in your reporting period, so the total amount expended at the point of reporting may differ from the total amount received during the same time period, as these funds do not have to be expended until the end of the calendar year.

5.01 Salaries and Wages (IMLS reported) – Include all salaries or wages paid out of the library budget for all library staff before deductions. This should include all staff reported in section 3 of the survey.

5.02a Employer FICA Contributions - Report FICA as employer’s portion of Social Security (OASDI – 6.2%) plus the employer’s portion of Medicare (HI – 1.45%) contributions paid. The amount of FICA the library pays can be affected by cafeteria plans, employees with salaries above the tax threshold, etc., so please enter the correct amount of employer contributions in the space provided.

5.02b Other Benefits - This should include all benefits for library staff outside of FICA contributions, including workers compensation premiums, health care costs, retirement, life insurance, guaranteed disability income protection, unemployment compensation, tuition, housing benefits, and any others.

5.05 Print Materials – Annual expenditures for the purchase of books, government documents, and any other print acquisitions. Do not include purchases of serials in this category, only print monographs. These can be circulating or non-circulating materials.

5.06 Print Serial Subscriptions – Annual expenditures for current serial subscriptions or binding or filling in serial back files. Do not include microfilm/microfiche expenditures here.

5.08 Electronic Materials (IMLS reported) – This field will report be all annual expenditures for electronic (digital) materials. This would include direct purchase costs, consortia fees, digitization expenses and annual subscription costs where applicable. Types of electronic materials include e–books, audio and video downloadables, e–serials (including journals), government documents, databases (including locally mounted, full text or not) electronic files, reference tools, scores, maps, or pictures in electronic or digital format, including materials digitized by the library. Electronic materials can be distributed on magnetic tape, diskettes, computer software, CD–ROM, or other portable digital carrier, and can be accessed via a computer, via access to the Internet, or by using an e–book reader. Include equipment expenditures that are inseparably bundled into the price of the information service product. Include expenditures for materials held locally and for remote electronic materials for which permanent or temporary access rights have been acquired. Include expenditures for database licenses. If electronic materials are provided through a cooperative (such as MOLIB2GO), include the total amount the library expends to be a member of the cooperative.

5.09 Audio – Physical Materials - These are physical materials on which sounds (only) are stored (recorded) and that can be reproduced (played back) mechanically, electronically, or both. Include records, audiocassettes, audio cartridges, audio discs, (including audio–CD–ROM s), audio–reels, talking books, Playaways, and other sound recordings. Expenditures for downloadable, electronic audio files should be included under Electronic Materials.

5.10 Video – Physical Materials - Videos are physical materials on which moving pictures are recorded, with or without sound. Electronic playback reproduces pictures, with or without sound, using a television receiver or monitor. Video formats may include tape, DVD, CD–ROM, etc. Expenditures for downloadable, electronic video files should be included under Electronic Materials.

5.11 All Other Physical Materials in Library Collection – Circulating and non-circulating physical materials for patron use other than print books, physical audio units, physical video units, and serials. These are materials in a fixed, physical format and can include a variety of item types, including microfilm, microfiche, wi-fi hotspots, sewing machines, tablets, cake pans, tools, and materials in new formats or formats not included in the above.

5.14 Other Operating Expenditures - All expenditures other than those reported in 5.01-5.11 for staff and collections. Include expenses such as binding, supplies, postage, repair or replacement of existing furnishings and equipment; and costs of computer hardware, software, and subscriptions used to support library operations (automation systems) or to link to external networks, including the Internet (MOREnet fees). Report contracts for services, such as costs of operating and maintaining physical facilities (telephone, utilities, lease, insurance, etc.), and fees paid to a consultant, auditor, architect, attorney, etc.

5.16a Athletes and Entertainer Tax Funds Used During Reporting Year - Report the amount of the library’s Total Operating Expenditures during the reporting year that were from A&E funds. This total may or may not equal the total funds received during your fiscal year.

5.16b Equalization Tax Funds Used During Reporting Year - Report the amount of the library’s Total Operating Expenditures during the reporting year that were from Equalization funds. This total may or may not equal the total funds received during your fiscal year.

Section 6: Capital Revenue and Expenditures

Capital Revenue - Capital Revenue must be designated as capital revenue for a specified capital project at the point it is collected. General revenue cannot be counted as capital revenue, even if it is used for a capital expenditure. Capital revenue figures should not be included in any other section in this survey.

Capital revenue will be reported by source in 6.01 – 6.04. This would be revenue received from this specific source designated for a specific capital project. The most common example of this would be a local tax levy collected for library construction projects. All funds collected would be reported in 6.01 Local Government Capital Revenue.

Include all capital funds received for (a) site acquisition; (b) new buildings; (c) additions to or renovation of library buildings; (d) furnishings, equipment, and initial collections for new buildings, building additions, or building renovations; (e) library automation systems; (f) new vehicles; and (g) other one–time major projects.

Exclude revenue for (1) replacement and repair of existing furnishings and equipment; (2) regular purchases of library materials; (3) investments for capital appreciation; (4) contributions to endowments; (5) revenue passed through to another agency; or (6) funds unspent in the previous fiscal year (i.e., carryover).

Capital Expenditures

Funding for capital expenditures can come from any source, including general revenue. Annual capital expenditures do not need to match capital revenue. Capital expenditures are usually for large projects involving new construction or major renovation to existing facilities.

Common expenditures would be: (a) site acquisition; (b) new buildings; (c) additions to or renovation of library buildings; (d) furnishings, equipment, and initial collections for new buildings, building additions, or building renovations; (e) library automation systems; (f) new vehicles; and (g) other one–time major projects.

Exclude expenditures for: (1) replacement and repair of existing furnishings and equipment; (2) regular purchases of library materials; (3) investments for capital appreciation; (4) contributions to endowments.

Section 7: Collections

Library collection information will be reported separately for physical and electronic collections. Report only items that have been purchased, leased or licensed by the library, a consortium, the state library, a donor or other person or entity. Included items must only be accessible with a valid library card or at a physical library location; inclusion in the catalog is not required. Do not include items freely available without monetary exchange. Do not include items that are permanently retained by the patron; count only items that have a set circulation period, are available for on-site use, or require remote authentication for access. Reporting of collections will be your library's collection as it was on the last day of the fiscal year for which you are reporting, not materials owned at the time of reporting.

7.02 – 7.07 How do I know which age group a material should be reported in?

Age groupings will generally be reported based on your library’s own classification. Items shelved in children’s areas will be reported as children’s items, and items shelved in the adult section will be considered adult items. Your ILS should have an age designation within the bibliographic record and should be able to run collection reports based on these designations.

7.01 – 7.14 Should we report items housed in the library at the time of the report or any items the library owns? What about materials that patrons have checked out and never returned?

You will count the total items owned by your library. It should include all materials currently checked out, including items that may be overdue. If item records are still available in your cataloging system, they will be counted. Withdrawn items will not be counted.

7.01 – 7.14 Where do we count reference materials and other items that are only for onsite use?

All items will be counted in their appropriate format and age categories. Materials that are only for onsite use will still be counted in the appropriate category, with the exception of materials in 7.14, which will only be counted if they circulate outside of the library. Physical materials available for onsite patron use will be counted in the appropriate category.

7.08 Our library has YA fiction collections, but not nonfiction. How should we answer when asking where YA items are categorized?

The “N/A-Young Adult fiction/nonfiction” option should only be used if your library has both a YA fiction and YA nonfiction section within the library. If your library does not have dedicated collections for either YA nonfiction or fiction you will specify whether these items are kept with the adult or children’s collections.

7.12 Do Playaway audio devices count as electronic or physical materials?

These all-in-one units will be counted as a physical material. Even though it is technically a digital audio book, the patron is checking out a physical copy of an audio material.

7.14 Our library has non-accessioned items that can be taken by patrons without checking them out. We also give out books as prizes for certain children’s events, and give out take and make programming kits. Are any or all of these items included in the “other circulating items” category?

No, these items would not be counted as other circulating items. This category is for circulating items that are not in a format counted in other categories. To be counted within this category an item will need to be cataloged and have a set loan period. Any items that patrons do not check out and return will not be counted anywhere in library collections. Similarly items to be used only within the library will not be counted in this category either.

How do I determine if an electronic resource is a database or electronic collection?

You can always consult the Guide to Counting Electronic Resources document for guidance on determining where items will be categorized, and to find a listing of where the most common resources are categorized. Generally, an electronic collection will consist almost solely of full-text materials that have a set circulation period for the patrons, and the library will pay for access to individual titles or pay per use. Databases usually allow for bibliographic searching and if full-text materials are provided they will not have a circulation period. Databases are usually purchased as a whole without purchasing individual items.

7.19 Our library is a MOREnet member, but we do not receive any database access from them. Question 7.19 asks MOREnet members to input a set number of databases. How should we respond?

If your library does not receive any database access from MOREnet you can enter zero into this field.

7.27 How do I determine what is an electronic serial or database. Don’t most databases have electronic serials?

Consulting the guide to Counting Electronic Resources will provide a list of where the most common items are classified. Electronic serials are usually purchased per item, per use, or for a grouping of items. Electronic serials will be for full-text access, and databases may or may not have full-text access, but the primary purpose is for bibliographic searching.

Print materials:

Print materials are non–serial printed publications (including music and maps) that are bound in hard or soft covers, or in loose–leaf format. Include non–serial government documents. Report the number of physical units, including duplicates. For smaller libraries, if volume data are not available, count the number of titles. Books packaged together as a unit (e.g., a 2–volume set) and checked out as a unit are counted as one physical unit.

7.01 Government Documents – Works published by federal, state or local government. These items may be in a variety of formats, but all printed materials published by government agencies will be reported here.

7.02 Adult Nonfiction – Print nonfiction materials classified as primarily for an adult audience. Factual materials, including reference works and bibliographies. Also include publications of music and maps that are bound in hard or soft covers, or in loose–leaf format. Do not include individual pieces of sheet music.

7.03 Young Adult Nonfiction - Print nonfiction materials classified as primarily for a young adult audience (generally considered to be 12-18). Will include factual print materials, including reference works and bibliographies. If your library does not classify or shelve materials using a young adult designation, this may be reported as zero.

7.04 Children’s Nonfiction - Print nonfiction materials classified as primarily for a children (generally considered to be ages 0-11). Will include factual print materials, including reference works and bibliographies.

7.05 Adult Fiction - Novels and short stories in the adult collection.

7.06 Young Adult Fiction - Novels and short stories in the classified as primarily for a young adult audience (generally considered to be 12-18). If your library does not classify or shelve materials using a young adult designation, this may be reported as zero.

7.07 Children’s Fiction - Novels and short stories in the classified as primarily for children (generally considered to be 0-11).

7.08 If the young adult materials are not counted as an independent category, which of the following categories include young adult materials? - If total YA nonfiction or fiction was reported as zero indicate whether the YA print materials are included in the adult or children’s totals. If YA materials are classified separately, you will respond “N/A Young Adult Fiction/Nonfiction”

7.09a Bound Serial Volumes – Number of volumes of bound serials. One bound serial volume may contain multiple single-issue periodicals bound into one volume and may be a year-long, or multi-year run. Do not count individual unbound back issues of periodicals.

7.09b Number of Print Serial Subscriptions - Report the number of current print serial subscriptions, including duplicates, for all outlets. Examples of serials are periodicals (magazines), newspapers, annuals, some government documents, some reference tools, and numbered monographic series. Count both purchased and donated subscriptions. List only the number of titles (including duplicates) —not the number of individual issues.

7.11 Microforms – Number of physical documents in microfilm or microfiche owned by the library.

7.12 Physical Audio Units - These are materials circulated in a fixed, physical format on which sounds (only) are stored (recorded) and that can be reproduced (played back) mechanically, electronically, or both. Include records, audiocassettes, audio cartridges, audio discs (including audio–CD–ROMs), audio–reels, talking books, Playaways, and other sound recordings. Do NOT include downloadable electronic audio files. Report the number of physical units, including duplicates. Items packaged together as a unit (i.e., two audiocassettes for one recorded book) and checked out as a unit are counted as one physical unit.

7.13 Physical Video Units - Videos are materials circulated in a fixed, physical format on which moving pictures are recorded, with or without sound. Electronic playback reproduces pictures, with or without sound, using a television receiver or computer monitor. Video formats may include tape, DVD, Blu-Ray and CD–ROM. Do NOT include downloadable electronic video titles. Report the number of physical units, including duplicates. Items packaged together as a unit and checked out as a unit are counted as one physical unit.

7.14 Other Circulating Physical Items - Report a single figure that includes the following: all circulating physical items other than print materials, physical audio units, physical video units, and serials reported in 7.01 – 7.13.

Report materials in a fixed, physical format available for use outside the library. These can include a variety of items types, such as wi-fi hotspots, sewing machines, cake pans, tools, etc. Report the number of units, including duplicates. Items packaged together as a unit (such as a set of cookie cutters) and checked out as a unit are counted as one physical unit. Do not include items that do not circulate outside of the library, such as laptops or other devices available for in-library use only.

Helpful Resources:

Electronic Materials

For each major category of electronic material, totals will be reported based on the payment ownership model for the materials. Materials obtained through a consortia and available to multiple library districts in the consortia will be reported in consortia held electronic books. Total consortia holdings for MOLIB2GO collections will be emailed to each member library. Library held materials will be pay per item electronic collections, and non-library held materials are pay per use materials. For non-library held materials the total number of items reported will match the total usage of the collection (total circulation) not the number of titles available from the electronic resource.

7.16a-c Electronic Books - E–books are digital documents (including those digitized by the library), licensed or not, where searchable text is prevalent, and which can be seen in analogy to a printed book (monograph). Include non–serial government documents. E–books are loaned to users on portable devices (e–book readers) or by transmitting the contents to the user’s personal computer for a limited time. For smaller libraries, if volume data are not available, the number of titles may be counted. E–books packaged together as a unit (e.g., multiple titles on a single e–book reader) and checked out as a unit are counted as one unit.

NOTE: For purposes of this survey, units are defined as “units of acquisition or purchase”. The “unit” is determined by considering whether the item is restricted to a finite number of simultaneous users or an unlimited number of simultaneous users.

Finite simultaneous use: units of acquisition or purchase is based on the number of simultaneous usages acquired (equivalent to purchasing multiple copies of a single title). For example, if a library acquires a title with rights to a single user at a time, then that item is counted as 1 “unit”; if the library acquires rights to a single title for 10 simultaneous users, then that item is counted as 10 “units”. For smaller libraries, if volume data are not available, the number of titles may be counted.

Exclude e–books that provide audio ONLY (i.e., talking books) – they should be counted as audio physical units (section 7.17) or audio downloadable units (section 7.15a). Include electronic, non–serial government documents. Do not include database units/titles in this count (i.e. eBook Academic Collection by EBSCO).

7.17a-c Downloadable Audio - These are downloadable electronic files on which sounds (only) are stored (recorded) and that can be reproduced (played back) electronically. Audio – Downloadable Units may be loaned to users on portable devices or by transmitting the contents to the user’s personal computer for a limited time. Include Audio – Downloadable Units held locally and remote Audio – Downloadable Units for which permanent or temporary access rights have been acquired. Items will be counted using the same criteria as described for electronic books.

7.18 a-c Downloadable Videos - These are downloadable electronic files on which moving pictures are recorded, with or without sound. Electronic playback reproduces pictures, with or without sound, using a television receiver, computer monitor or video–enabled mobile device. Video – Downloadable Units may be loaned to users on portable devices or by transmitting the contents to the user’s personal computer for a limited time. Include Video – Downloadable Units held locally and remote Video – Downloadable Units for which permanent or temporary access rights have been acquired. Items will be counted using the same criteria as described for electronic books.

Licensed Databases - A database is a collection of electronically stored data or unit records (facts, bibliographic data, abstracts, texts) with a common user interface and software for the retrieval and manipulation of the data. These may be full text records, bibliographic information, or some combination. The data or records are usually collected with a particular intent and relate to a defined topic. Count databases available online through authentication or available in physical format (CD-ROM). Each licensed database product is counted individually, even if access to several licensed products is supported through the same vendor interface (for instance EBSCO Academic Search, MasterFILE, Consumer Health, etc.). Subscriptions to electronic serial titles are counted under Current Electronic Serial Subscriptions, not as licensed databases. Do not include open access databases your library utilizes, but does not pay a fee to access. Collections of circulating electronic materials, such as those counted in 7.16 – 7.18 will not be counted here. Databases will be reported by payment source.

7.19 MOREnet Provided Databases – This field will count all databases that are provided with standard MOREnet access. For the 2023 survey, all MOREnet members will report 25 databases here.

7.20 Number of Databases Provided by the State Library – This is the number of databases in which statewide access for all libraries is paid for by the State Library. The State Library will provide the total number of databases, as well as database usage numbers for your library based on your fiscal year.

7.22 Number of Databases Purchased Through Joint Pricing or Consortia Agreements – Report the number of databases your library obtains through consortia membership, or database access whose cost and access is shared between multiple institutions. Do not include any databases provided by the State Library or MOREnet, as these are counted elsewhere.

7.23 Number of Databases Purchased through Direct Order by the Library – Report the number of databases your library purchases directly. This will be all remaining databases not reported as obtained through MOREnet, the State Library or a joint pricing/consortia agreement.

7.26 Does the Library Provide Remote Access to any of its Databases? – Reply yes if any of the databases reported here can be accessed by patrons offsite through a remote authentication method.

Electronic Serial Subscriptions

Report the number of current electronic and digital serial subscriptions (e–serials, e–journals), including duplicates for all outlets. Examples include periodicals (magazines), newspapers, annuals, some government documents, some reference tools, and numbered monographic series. Electronic serial subscriptions include serials held locally or remote resources that the library has authorization to access, including those available through statewide or consortia agreements. Report each accessible periodical as one item. Serials may be purchased and accessible directly from the source, or through an electronic serial platform the library purchases access to or pays for individual titles from. Do not include subscriptions to indexing and abstracting databases that include full–text serial content, they are counted under databases above. Serials will be reported by source.

7.27a Number of Library-Purchased Electronic Subscriptions – Report the total number of electronic serials the library purchased directly, ie. not from a consortia.

7.27b Number of Consortia Held Electronic Subscriptions – Report the total number of electronic serials the library gains access to through consortia membership. Total electronic serials for MOLIB2GO members will be provided to each library based on fiscal year.

Section 8: Services

The services section will report on library usage and services. Please remember that you are reporting for your library’s most recently completed fiscal year. Reported figures should be the summation of the entire fiscal year. Estimates are allowed for fields where the counting method is reported. Specific guidance for obtaining estimations will be provided in the instructions specific to that field.

8.01a Traffic was counted for a portion of the year, but not all. Should I report the traffic as an annual count or an estimate?

If an actual count was used for the vast majority of the year, traffic will be reported as an annual count. If there were long periods of time (generally greater than two weeks) where actual counts were not collected and were estimated from count data, then visits will be reported as an estimate. You may need to use your best discretion in making this determination.

8.02a Our library does not have designated OPACs, but patrons often use public internet computers to look up items. How should this use be counted?

Use of these computers will still be counted in 8.02a as a use of a public internet computer. It is unreasonable a library would be able to determine exactly what all patrons are using internet computers for each time they are used. Additionally, they may be using the computer for the catalog as well as other services.

8.02a Is there any specific length of time that should qualify as a computer use? If a patron uses a computer for several hours should that count as multiple uses?

You will only count the number of times a patron uses a computer regardless of the length of time. However, if your library is using tracking software to count logins and the computer has a time limit, it is acceptable to count each additional login as a new session.

8.03a How do I know how many times devices connected to our wireless network? Are there instructions for obtaining this information?

This will be device specific. Most wireless routers will have an administrative login that will allow you to access some level of use statistics for the device. How detailed the information is and for what length of time it is collected will vary by device. For those devices where an annual count is unavailable, you may use weekly counts, or daily counts for a week’s time, to create an estimate for annual use. Instructions on how to obtain this information should be available from the device manufacturer. MOREnet members may be able to contact MOREnet for assistance on pulling this information from their devices.

8.04a Do we count reference transactions as the number of patrons we answer questions for, or the total number of questions answered?

Reference transactions will be the total number of questions answered, not the number of individuals asking questions. One patron interaction may involve multiple reference questions.

8.05 How do I figure out how many visits my library website or online catalog had in a year?

This will vary depending on what vendor you are using for your library website or catalog. Many website platforms will have built in metrics that administrators can access. For catalogs integrated with an ILS, the ILS vendor may also have a way to access this information. In cases, where these services are not provided, you can often use Google Analytics to obtain these numbers. Ploud member libraries will have Google Analytics already set up for their library and can contact the State Library for assistance in accessing this information.

8.06 Should I count registered users who have not used the library in some time? How do I know if a patron is still an active registered user?

Libraries should periodically purge records that have not been used. If a patron record has had no activity for three years, it should be purged and removed from the total count. If patrons have active bills or checked out materials that would mean the record needs to be retained by your library, these older records should still be removed from the total registered user count in some way.

8.08 – 8.10 Our library uses auto-renewals on library items. Does an automatic renewal still count as a circulation?

Annual circulation counts both checkouts and renewals. Auto-renewals will count the same as a manual renewal and will be included in total circulation counts.

8.08 – 8.10c If a library item does not have an age designation where should its circulation be counted?

By default, materials without an age designation will be counted as an adult circulation. This is more common in electronic materials than in physical items, as some electronic platforms do not break out circulation by age group. Be aware that many physical items that would be cataloged without an age designation will fall into the category of “other circulating item” and should be counted in 8.08d instead of by age group in 8.08a, 8.08b, or 8.08c.

8.08b Our library does not have a young adult section. What should I report here?

If you do not have a classification for young adult materials you will report zero circulation in this category and count circulation by the age group the material is classified in. If it does not have an age designation it will be counted as an adult item by default.

8.08d Our library “checks out” devices to be used by patrons within the library. Does this circulation count here, or do the items have to be checked out to use outside the library?

Materials borrowed for internal use should not be counted in the overall circulation figures. Ideally total circulation would only count items that circulate outside of the library, not intended for in-library use only.

8.11b How do I find total database usage for MOREnet provided databases?

All MOREnet members should be able to log into my.more.net to obtain their specific database use numbers for MOREnet provided databases. If you do not know your login information or have trouble getting the figures you need from the website you can email help@more.net for assistance.

8.18 – 8.19 Our library is a member of a consortia and/or has a reciprocal lending agreement with another library system using a shared catalog. Are items borrowed between libraries within a consortium or using a shared catalog counted as interlibrary loans?

Yes, all items borrowed or lent between library districts using any of these means would still be counted as an interlibrary loan and counted in this section. Any time an item is physically or electronically transferred from one library system to another it would be counted (with the exception of truly shared collections such as MOLIB2GO.) If you are using a shared catalog to facilitate borrowing with other libraries you will need to make sure to check 8.18c to show you use a shared catalog to facilitate interlibrary loans.

8.01a Annual Number of Library Visits - Total number of persons entering the library for whatever purpose during the year. Actual counts can be obtained using door counter devices to monitor visits throughout the year. Report only traffic entering the library building. You will not count traffic for curbside pickups, drive-through services, or visits to the library grounds. If an actual count of visits is unavailable, determine an annual estimate by counting visits during a typical week and multiplying the count by total weeks open for the year. A “typical week” is a time that is neither unusually busy nor unusually slow. Avoid holidays, vacation periods for key staff, or days when unusual events are taking place in the community or the library. Choose a week in which the library is open its regular hours. The estimate should be gathered from seven consecutive days. If an estimate is used, the reporting method it 8.01b should be marked as an annual estimate.

8.02a Annual Number of Uses of Public Internet Computers Owned by the Library - Report the total number of uses or sessions for Internet computers owned by the library during the last year. Do not count uses of dedicated catalog computers (OPACs). Do include library owned laptops, Chromebooks, or tablets available for in-library use. A user who uses the library’s public internet computer(s) three times in a year would count as three uses. If an actual count of public computer use is unavailable, determine an annual estimate by counting use during a typical week and multiplying the count by weeks open during the year. A “typical week” is a time that is neither unusually busy nor unusually slow. Avoid holidays, vacation periods for key staff, or days when unusual events are taking place in the community or the library. Choose a week in which the library is open its regular hours. The estimate should be gathered from seven consecutive days.

Remember – This count should include only library–owned Internet access computers. Do not include Wi–Fi uses by non–library owned computers.

8.03a Annual Number of Wireless Sessions - Report the number of wireless sessions provided by the library wireless service annually. Count one session for each time a device connects to the library's wireless network, regardless of the duration of connection. If possible, only count sessions for patron devices and exclude library devices such as routers, access points, printers, and public access computers; otherwise, if patron devices cannot be isolated, report sessions for all devices.

NOTE: If an annual count of wireless sessions is unavailable, count wireless sessions during a typical week or weeks using methods like hardware logging or network scanning, and multiply the count to represent an annual estimate. (Do not conduct visual surveys of devices in use as a method to establish a count of a typical week.) A “typical week” is a time that is neither unusually busy nor unusually slow. Avoid holiday times, vacation periods for key staff, or days when unusual events are taking place in the community or in the library. Choose a week in which the library is open its regular hours.

8.04a Annual Number of Reference Transactions - Reference Transactions are information consultations in which library staff recommend, interpret, evaluate, and/or use information resources to help others to meet particular information needs.

Reference transactions do not include formal instruction or exchanges that provide assistance with locations, schedules, equipment, supplies, or policy statements.

NOTES:

(1) A reference transaction includes information and referral service, unscheduled individual instruction and assistance in using information sources (including websites and computer–assisted instruction).

(2) Count Readers Advisory questions as reference transactions.

(3) Information sources include (a) printed and non–printed material; (b) machine–readable databases (including computer–assisted instruction); (c) the library’s own catalogs and other holdings records; (d) other libraries and institutions through communication or referral; and (e) persons both inside and outside the library.

(4) When a staff member uses information gained from previous use of information sources to answer a question, the transaction is reported as a reference transaction even if the source is not consulted again.

(5) If a contact includes both reference and directional services, it should be reported as one reference transaction.

(6) Duration should not be an element in determining whether a transaction is a reference transaction.

(7) Do not include transactions that include only a directional service, such as instruction for locating staff, library users, or physical features within the library. Examples of directional transactions include, “Where is the reference librarian? Where is Susan Smith? Where is the rest room? Where are the 600s? Can you help me make a photocopy?”

If an annual count of reference transactions is unavailable, count reference transactions during a typical week or weeks, and multiply the count to represent an annual estimate. A “typical week” is a time that is neither unusually busy nor unusually slow. Avoid holiday times, vacation periods for key staff, or days when unusual events are taking place in the community or in the library. Choose a week in which the library is open its regular hours.

8.05 Number of Virtual Visits – Report the number of online sessions (visits) to your library’s website or online public access catalog (OPAC). Visits can be from within our outside of the library and total visits will be counted. Depending on how your library website and catalog are set up, you may have access to analytics directly through the vendor that you can use to obtain these numbers. If not, Google Analytics is a helpful tool to help you obtain virtual visit numbers.

8.06 Number of Registered Users - A registered user is a library user who has applied for and received an identification number or card from the public library that has established conditions under which the user may borrow library materials and gain access to other library resources. Report total number of active registered users. Files should have been purged within the past three (3) years.

Please remember for all circulation totals, this will include total circulations and renewals for library items in all formats.

8.08a - c Circulation of Adult Physical Materials - The total annual circulation of physical adult materials of all types, including renewals. This would include circulating print monograms and serials, audio, and video materials. All other circulating physical materials will be reported in the “other physical circulation” category.  Note: Count all materials in all formats that are charged out for use outside the library. Interlibrary loan transactions included are only items borrowed for users. Do not include items checked out to another library. Report all items by the age group designated in the item record. Children’s materials are generally considered to be intended for ages 0 – 11, young adult materials for ages 12-18, and adult materials for those over 18 years of age. If unable to break down circulation by age group, report physical circulation in the adult materials category.

8.08d Other Physical Circulation - Circulation of all physical items other than print books, physical audio units, physical video units, and serials, including renewals. These are materials in a fixed, physical format available for use outside the library. These can include a variety of items types, such as wi-fi hotspots, sewing machines, cake pans, tools, telescopes, board games, video games, etc. Circulation of any item reported in field 7.14 “other circulating physical items” will be reported here. Circulation will be reported in this category regardless of age group.

8.10a – Circulation of Electronic Materials - Total annual circulation of all electronic adult materials in all formats to all patrons, including renewals. Electronic Materials are materials that are distributed digitally and can be accessed via a computer, the Internet, or a portable device such as an e–book reader. Types of electronic materials include e–books, downloadable electronic video, and audio files. Electronic Materials packaged together as a unit and checked out as a unit are counted as one unit. Include circulation only for items counted under Electronic Books (E–Books), Audio–Downloadable Units and Video–Downloadable Units. Do not include database usage in this category, only items with a set circulation period will be reported. Children’s materials are generally considered to be intended for ages 0 – 11, young adult materials for ages 12-18, and adult materials for those over 18 years of age.  If electronic circulation is not broken down by age report the total electronic use under Circulation of adult materials (electronic). Include library held, consortia held, and qualified non–library held electronic materials.

8.11a-c Database Usage - The number of full–content units or descriptive records examined, downloaded, or otherwise supplied to user, from online library resources that require user authentication but do not have a circulation period. Examining documents is defined as having the full text of a digital document or electronic resource downloaded or fully displayed. Some electronic services do not require downloading as simply viewing documents is normally sufficient for user needs. Include use both inside and outside the library. Do not include use of the OPAC or website.

State Library database usage are for those databases provided free of cost by the State Library to all Missouri libraries (VetNow, TeachingBooks, Tumblebooks). These totals will be provided to your library.

MOREnet database usage will be for those databases libraries receive access to through their MOREnet subscription. Usage of these databases can be found by logging into my.more.net. If you require assistance in obtaining your use numbers you can contact help@more.net by email.

All remaining database usage will be reported in the library purchased database usage category. Each database may track metrics slightly differently and have different methods to access analytics. Information on how to access analytics should be available from the vendor.

8.18 – 8.19 Interlibrary Loan - Materials (or copies of materials) provided or received by one autonomous library to another upon request. The libraries involved in interlibrary loans are not under the same library administration. These data are to be reported as annual figures. Libraries part of the same consortium should include all loans within the consortia in this as an interlibrary loan as well. Autonomous libraries with lending agreements and shared catalogs will also report all library materials received or provided to another autonomous libraries as an interlibrary loan.

Libraries will also report how they request interlibrary loan materials from other libraries. Please select all methods that apply to your library and have been used within the last year.

Section 8 Part II: Programs

Helpful Resources

Programs and attendance will be reported both by age and by program type (virtual, onsite in-person, offsite in-person). All programs and attendees will be reported once by intended age group and once by program type. Total numbers of programs will be totaled in each section and since reporting is done in each category, the total number of programs and attendees by age group must match the total number of programs and attendees by program type.

A program is any planned event which introduces the group attending to any of the activities or which directly provides information to participants. Programs are differentiated between synchronous programs that provide real-time interactions with attendees and asynchronous (recorded) programs which do not have real-time interactions between the presenter(s) and attendees. Programs may cover use of the library, library services, or library tours. Programs may also provide cultural, recreational, or educational information, often designed to meet a specific social need.

Synchronous library programs include:

  • All program sessions that are sponsored or co-sponsored by the library. For a program session to be sponsored or co-sponsored by the library, the library must contribute financial resources or staff time toward the program session. For a program session that is part of a larger community event (such as a farmer’s market or festival), it is not necessary for the library to also sponsor or organize the larger event.
  • Both on-site and off-site program sessions. For example, include a storytime at a farmer’s market or a presentation to a school group about library resources conducted at a school.
  • Live-streamed virtual (synchronous) program sessions that are sponsored or co-sponsored by the library.
  • Program sessions with attendance of zero or one if they were intended for a group.

Synchronous library programs do not include:

  • Program sessions sponsored by other groups that use library facilities. For example, do not include a homeschooling group hosting a speaker in a meeting room without facilitation from library staff.
  • Offsite outreach efforts that do not otherwise meet the definition of a program session. For example, do not include having a library card signup booth at a farmer’s market.
  • Recorded (asynchronous) presentations of program content; these should be counted in Total Number of Asynchronous Program Presentations (data element 620). Programming that is shared on the library’s website or social media that is not sponsored or co-sponsored by the library. For example, do not include sharing a video from an author’s website of him or her reading a book.
  • Activities delivered on a one-to-one basis, rather than to a group, such as one-to-one literacy tutoring, services to homebound, homework assistance, and mentoring activities.
  • Passive or self-directed activities that do not occur at a scheduled time. For example, do not include leaving an art project or puzzle on a table for participants to complete.

Examples of these types of programs include film showings, lectures, story hours, literacy, English as a second language, citizenship classes, and book discussions. Remember, if programs are offered in a series, count each gathering in the series as a program (e.g., a story hour offered once a week, 48 weeks a year, should be counted as 48 programs). Attendance numbers should reflect all program attendees, regardless of age. Live, virtual programs are conducted via a Web conferencing or Webinar platform such as Facebook, YouTube, or Zoom, during which a library staff member (or other party sponsored by the library) is presenting to or interacting with an audience in real–time. For live virtual programs attendance will be reported as the number of unique viewers, or if unavailable, the peak number of simultaneous viewers for the program.

Do we count library programs held that had zero attendance?

A library program must have more than one attendee in order to be counted on the survey. The assumption is that a program with zero attendees would not occur as there would be no reason to go forward with an event with no attendees. A program with one attendee would be a one on one session which does not qualify as a program by IMLS definitions. If planned programs have no attendance they will not be reported on the survey.

8.20 – 8.26 When reporting by age group should we report attendees by age or by the program they are attending. Should adults that bring their children to a children’s storytime be counted in attendance at synchronous adult programs, or attendance at synchronous children’s programs?

All attendance will be reported by the intended age group of the program itself, not the age of attendees. If a program is intended for an audience age 0-5, but has adults and older siblings attending, all attendees regardless of age, will be reported in the total attendance in the early literacy 0-5 range. Likewise, a program intended for adults who may bring their children along will have all attendees, regardless of age, recorded in attendance at adult programs.

8.20 – 8.26 Should all programs that have a mixture of attendees from different age groups always be counted as general interest programs?

General attendance programs are programs intended to appeal to all age groups that do not have a specific targeted age group. The intended audience is key. A true general interest program will be intended to appeal to attendees of all ages, including adults. If a program is intended for youth but with an audience that would maybe include early literacy, children, and young adults, it would be counted in the age group that most fits. General interest programs should be intended for all age groups in a given family.

8.27a We held a library program on the grounds of the library, but it was held outside the physical building. Would this be counted as an onsite or offsite program?

A program will only be counted as an offsite program if it is held off of library property. Programs held in outdoor spaces, but still at a library branch will still be counted as an onsite program.

If our library pre-records program content, but holds live events to show this content is this a synchronous or asynchronous virtual program?

A program is considered synchronous if there is the opportunity for real-time interactions between a presenter and the audience. If programs are pre-recorded, but moderated in real-time by a presenter it would be considered a synchronous virtual program.

Our library has children’s activities set up that patrons can complete on their own at any time. Would these be counted as children’s programs on the survey?

Passive programming does not fit the current IMLS definitions for library programming. In order to be counted as a library program, the event must be a planned event held at a specific time that allows for real-time interaction between attendees and a presenter. These types of passive programs do not fit those criteria. Asynchronous virtual programs are counted on the survey, but are reported separately from total synchronous programming for this very reason.

8.29b When holding live virtual programs, there will often be multiple people watching a program or participating using a single device (for example parents and their children participating in a virtual storytime using one computer). In this case do we count the total number of devices connected, or the total number of participants we can see on the screen?

For simplicity and consistency, it is easier to only count the number of devices or views of the program than to attempt to determine how many individuals are actually watching on each device. If you are easily able to determine that multiple viewers are watching through a single device you could add those additional viewers to the total attendance count for that program. However, you should not attempt to estimate the number of viewers for each device connected to your program. Generally, all individual devices connected will be counted as a single attendee.

8.20a – 8.20b Synchronous Adult Programs and Attendance - An adult program session is any planned event for which the primary audience is adults age 19 or older. Examples of these types of program sessions include, but are not limited to, book discussions, citizenship classes, and lectures. Each program session should only be counted in one age category based on its primary target audience. Exclude asynchronous programming, such as circulating take–home activity kits or recorded virtual programs.

8.21a – 8.21b Synchronous Early Literacy Programs and Attendance - A program session targeted at children ages 0-5 is any planned event for which the primary audience is infants, toddlers, or preschool-age children. Examples of these types of program sessions include, but are not limited to, story hours, every child ready to read programs, musical or sing-along events, and puppet shows. Include program sessions aimed at children ages 0-5 even if adult caregivers also attend. Each program session should only be counted in one age category based on its primary target audience. Exclude asynchronous programming, such as circulating take–home activity kits or recorded virtual programs.

8.22a – 8.22b Synchronous Children’s Programs and Attendance - A program session targeted at children ages 6-11 is any planned event for which the primary audience is elementary-school-age children. Examples of these types of program sessions include, but are not limited to, story hours, science events, crafting classes, and summer reading events. Include program sessions aimed at children ages 6-11 even if adult caregivers also attend with the children. Each program session should only be counted in one age category based on its primary target audience. Exclude asynchronous programming, such as circulating take–home activity kits or recorded virtual programs.

8.23a – 8.23b Synchronous Young Adult Programs and Attendance - A young adult program session is any planned event for which the primary audience is young adults ages 12 to 18 years. Examples of these types of program sessions include, but are not limited to, book clubs, college prep programs, teen tech or gaming clubs, and summer reading events. Each program session should only be counted in one age category based on its primary target audience. Exclude asynchronous programming, such as circulating take–home activity kits or recorded virtual programs.

8.24a – 8.24b Synchronous General Interest Programs and Attendance - A general interest program session is any planned event that is appropriate for any age group or multiple age groups. Include all-age, all-library, family, and intergenerational program sessions. Examples of these types of program sessions include, but are not limited to, family game nights, holiday events, storytelling programs, or chess clubs. Include all programs here that do not fit into the other age category elements. Each program session should only be counted in one age category based on its primary target audience; do not include program sessions here that have already been counted in earlier age category elements. Avoid including program sessions that are targeted at more than one non-adult age category (and are not targeted at adults); these should be counted in the child or young adult age category that best represents the target audience. Exclude asynchronous programming, such as circulating take–home activity kits or recorded virtual programs.

 Program reporting by type is specific to synchronous programs already reported by age group. The total number of programs and total attendance reported for in-person onsite, in-person offsite, and synchronous virtual programs must match the total programs and attendees reported by age group.

8.27a – 8.27b In-Person Onsite Programs and Attendance - An in-person onsite program session is any planned event that includes an in-person attendance option and takes place at library facilities. Examples include, but are not limited to, a job skills class in the library or a nature program on the library grounds. Regardless of the number of formats in which a program session is offered, each program session should only be counted once and in one format category. Include in-person program sessions that also have a virtual attendance option and count them as a single program session.

8.28a- 8.28b In-Person Offsite Programs and Attendance - An in-person offsite program session is any planned event that includes an in-person attendance option and takes place somewhere other than the library or the library grounds. Examples include, but are not limited to, facilitating a book club at a local nursing home, hosting a storytime at a local farmer’s market, or visiting a school to present about library services. Regardless of the number of formats in which a program session is offered, each program session should only be counted once and in one format category. Include in-person program sessions that also have a virtual attendance option and count them as a single program session.

8.29a – 8.29b Synchronous Virtual Programs - A synchronous (live) virtual program session is any planned event that is streamed virtually and can be viewed live as it progresses (i.e., live-streaming). Regardless of the number of formats in which a program session is offered, each program session should only be counted once and in one format category. Include virtual program sessions that are also recorded. Include program sessions hosted on Facebook Premiere that are facilitated by a staff member. Count virtual program sessions at the administrative entity level; do not duplicate numbers at each branch. Exclude program sessions that also have an in-person component; these should be counted under in-person onsite programs Sessions or in-person offsite programs.

For attendance, count each participant device connected to a virtual program as a single attendee. For program sessions hosted on Facebook Live, YouTube Live, or similar platforms, count peak concurrent viewers. For those hosted on videoconferencing platforms, count the maximum number of non-staff participants during the session. For virtual program sessions that are also recorded for later, on-demand, asynchronous viewing, exclude views that occur after the session has ended; these should be counted under Total Views of Asynchronous Program Presentations. For program sessions that also have an in-person component, exclude in-person attendance; this should be counted

Of those programs reported by age and type:

8.31 How many programs were specifically for seniors - Report the total number of programs of those already reported that were specifically targeted towards older adults.

8.32 How many were ESOL, ESL, or ELL courses - Report the total number of programs held for any age group that specifically focused on literacy and language skills for English for Speakers of Other Languages, English as a Second Language or English Language Learners.

8.33 How many were literacy-focused programs – Report the total number of programs held for any age group that specifically focused on literacy skills. Common examples would be story hours and summer reading programs, but any literacy focused program would be counted here.

Other Program Types:

8.34a – 8.34b Asynchronous virtual programs and attendance - An asynchronous program presentation is any recording of program content that cannot be viewed live as it unfolds (i.e., on-demand streaming). Only include program presentations posted during the reporting period. Regardless of the number of platforms on which a presentation is posted, count each unique presentation only once. Include program sessions hosted on Facebook Premiere that are not facilitated by a staff member. Count asynchronous program presentations at the administrative entity level; do not duplicate numbers at each branch. Include recordings of synchronous program sessions that were available for asynchronous viewing after the session ended.

The count of views of asynchronous program presentations for a period of thirty (30) days after the presentation was posted, even if that period extends beyond the survey reporting period (or fiscal year). For program presentations made available via Facebook, count unique 1-minute views of each video. For those made available via other platforms, count unique views of each video. For program presentations that are recordings of synchronous virtual program sessions, exclude synchronous attendance.

NOTE: Program presentations and attendance for asynchronous virtual programs will not be included in synchronous program totals reported by age and type. If a recording of a synchronous program is later reposted as a recording it will be counted independently as one occurrence of a synchronous program and one instance of an asynchronous program with separate attendance and view totals.

8.34c Number of Take-Home Activity Kits Provided - Take–home activity kits are pre–made kits provided by the library containing interactive activities that patrons can use to participate in programming in a non–library setting.

Program Partners – For each type of program partner select yes or no based on whether your library partnered with outside organizations for any of the listed types. In provided boxes list those partner organizations.

Section 9: Technology

The technology portion of the survey will report on technology resources available at your library. You will be reporting on resources available for your patrons as well as some basic information on your library’s automation system.

9.07 – 9.08 How do I know what my internet connection speed is?

Usually when contracting out for internet service, an expected bandwidth will be given by the service provider. This would be the number reported here. For MOREnet members you can contact help@more.net for assistance in finding your internet connection speed. If no other information is available you can test your internet connection speed through your internet browser, but this will often differ from the predicted speed from your service provider. If testing this way, you may take multiple measurements at different portions of the day and average the totals.

9.09a -9.09b Our library has laptops and/or tablets for in library use. Would these items be counted here?

If an item is checked out to the patron it will be counted here. If the item is available for in library use without circulating the device to the patron it will not be counted.

9.10 Our library has computers set up to access specific databases that are licensed to those devices. Would those computers be counted under internet access computers?

Computers set up for a dedicated purpose such as connection to the library’s catalog or a specific database would not be counted here. However, if that computer is mainly used for general internet access, but also has a licensed database that can be used by that computer it may be counted as an internet access computer. The determination is based on the primary purpose of that device.

9.11a How do we determine if our computer area qualifies as a computer lab?

A computer lab is primarily intended to be an area to provide computer and technology training to the public. If the primary purpose of an area is computer training it will be considered a computer lab. If the primary purpose of an area is to provide general computer access to the public it will not be counted as a computer lab. Computers in a computer lab will not be counted with the total number of internet access computers reported in 9.10a.

9.10a Are the young adult and children’s computers reported in 9.10b and 9.10c included in the total for 9.10a?

Yes, 9.10a will include all internet access computers and will include the totals for children’s and YA dedicated computers reported in 9.10b and 9.10c.

9.01 – 9.04 Library Automation System – This section will report the software system you are currently using for your library’s automation (integrated library system). Last year’s results will be pre-populated and you will only need to make changes if your system has changed in the last year. You will also report if your library upgraded the ILS or performed any other significant technology upgrades in the last year.

9.05 – 9.08 Internet Access – Libraries will report their internet access provider, current bandwidth and related information.

9.09a – 9.09c Technology Lending – Indicate the total number of devices (not total circulation) available for patron loan for your library. Only count items that are circulated to patrons in some way.

9.10a- 9.10c Internet Access Computers - Report the number of the library’s Internet computers [personal computers (PCs), laptops, and tablets], whether purchased, leased, or donated, used by the general public in the library. Do not include computers that connect to the Internet for a dedicated purpose (e.g., to access an OPAC or specific database, or to train the public) or purposes. This figure should EXCLUDE computers in labs that are regularly used for training classes, or laptops in mobile labs that are stored away during most hours of operation.

All computers will be reported in 9.10a, and the subset of those computers in children’s or young adult areas of the library will be reported in 9.10b and 9.10c.

9.11 – 9.12 Computer Labs and Training - A computer lab is primarily intended to be an area to provide computer and technology training to the public. If the primary purpose of an area is computer training it will be considered a computer lab. Computers listed as part of a training lab will not be counted in total internet access computers in 9.10a – 9.10c.